Travel theme: Spring

Taken at face value as seen from my kitchen window, this White Star White Magnolia looks lacy, delicate, and pretty, especially when viewed with bright yellow forsythia in the background. It’s OK, lovely in fact, as it is — seen from a distance.

Outside my back door, a White Star White Magnolia is the first sign of spring.

Outside my back door, a White Star White Magnolia is the first sign of spring.

But it’s not until we get a close-up view that we know spring is here.  This treasured tree blooms for a week at most, and sometimes it has a hard time holding on even for that long. It’s easily buffeted by spring winds and weighed down by the gentlest rains, so blooms have little staying power given nature’s whims.

Early morning rain on a White Star White Magnolia

Early morning rain on a White Star White Magnolia

No matter.  Sometimes the fleeting nature of this tree makes it even more endearing.  The delicate while blossoms.  Subtle pink markings.  Pale yellow stamen.  Fuzzy gray calyx. We love it all, but have to get close to see its true beauty.

Just opening.

Just opening.

A hint of pink

A hint of pink

The inside story

The inside story

Spring officially arrives with the blooming of our White Star White Magnolia.  And its gentle Hello is one of the most welcome signs around.

For more entries in Ailsa’s Where’s My Backpack challenge this week — Travel theme: Springclick here.

21 thoughts on “Travel theme: Spring

      1. Curt Mekemson

        We have redbud and dogwood here in Oregon as well. The Natchez Trace is really beautiful this time of year with blooming dogwood. I assume you have followed it while out wandering. –Curt

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