Can you say tagine? Culinary Journey in Morocco begins!

Chefs Joanne Weir and Bahija like what the see!

Chefs Joanne Weir and Bahija like what the see!

If you ask anyone about Moroccan cooking — whether they live in Morocco or somewhere around the world — the person is bound to mention tagine.  A tagine is a cooking vessel with a sort of upside-down-funnel-shaped top that fits tightly on a deep saucer.  It holds an assortment of meats and vegetables, allowing the steam generated from the cooking to rise and caress those meats and veggies in a blending way.  But the word tagine is also used alone to indicate what’s for dinner — as in, “We’re having tagine tonight.” We found tagine dishes in almost every restaurant and riad we visited. So, it’s no wonder that Chef Joanne Weir and Chef Bahija of Jnane Tamsna chose tagine cooking for our first adventure in preparing Moroccan cuisine.

In a charming outdoor “room” with twig lattice walls and covered top, 15 participants in Joane Weir’s Culinary Journey in Morocco 2018 took their seats, picked up their knives and went to work. And I was proud to be among them!

Ready to make chicken tagine in the utdoor classroom at Jnane Tamsna

Ready to make chicken tagine in the utdoor classroom at Jnane Tamsna

The ever-vigilant Jnane Tamsna staff had started the fires of individual cookers on outdoor tables, so we were ready to begin.

Individual cookers for tagine cooking class.

Individual cookers for tagine cooking class.

There are some basics with cooking Chicken Tagine, our menu item for Day 1.  Although there are no required ingredients, we were told that most tagine dishes include a meat like chicken or lamb, spices (mostly salt, pepper, turmeric and saffron), diced red onion, and extra virgin olive oil.  For our chicken tagines, we first chopped red onion and laid it on the bottom of the tagine. Step two involved seasoning the chicken pieces with spices and herbs in various amounts.

Layers of chopped onion, seasoned chicken and spices in a pottery tagine.

Layers of chopped onion, seasoned chicken and spices in a pottery tagine.

Joanne and Bahija explained the types of spices used in Morocco, adding suggestions on how much or how little to use.  But even with their suggestions, we had the leeway to choose our own spices in the amounts we found most satisfying.  (I found that to be true for most of what we cooked during our Culinary Journey: we had the freedom to make the dishes our own.) For my chicken tagine, I went a bit heavy with salt and pepper, lighter on turmeric.  And then I slathered my chicken with cilantro and garlic.  Others ventured out with a blend of spices called ras el hanout.

Vegetables are piled high atop seasoned chicken and chopped onion.

Vegetables are piled high atop seasoned chicken and chopped onion. Do you see little threads of saffron on top?

Next, we added vegetables or fruits to our liking. For a chicken tagine heavy on vegetables, Chef Bahija and Chef Joanne laid out quite the variety:   tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, peppers, fava beans, and olives.  But if you wanted a sweeter tagine, there was something for you as well: apricots, apples, almonds, prunes, dates, raisins and pear.  As I said, your tagine was yours — from the choices you made to how to finely you chopped ingredients and even how you arranged it all into a pile.

And what fun it was! Some even became a bit giddy at this “doable dish.”  After all, the mystique of cooking tagine was over.  This was one dish we could make at home!

The mother-daughter team of Susan Gaither and Kendra Hodder from California had fun showing off their tagines!

The mother-daughter team of Susan Gaither and Kendra Hodder from California had fun showing off their tagines!

After layering the chosen veggies or sweets atop our chicken, we carried our tagines to the cooking table where Chefs Bahija and Joanne added water to each unit.  And the waiting began.

It wasn’t long before the steam inside the pottery tagines had done its magic, converting raw ingredients into a savory or sweet treat.  When all was done, we gathered at an outdoor table to eat what we cooked, thanks to the patience and guidance of our two chefs, Bahija and Joanne.

Chefs Bahija and Joanne making cooking fun in Morocco!

Chefs Bahija and Joanne making cooking fun in Morocco!

Cooking tagine was definitely fun, but so was another custom we learned from our guides.  Every time someone took our picture, we heard this:  “Say Tagine“! (And we smiled, loving this alternative to the “Say Cheese” we’d always heard.) “Say Tagine” became our go-to command whenever we took pictures of our group.  And there was much to smile about in our Culinary Journey in Morocco! Say Tagine,  ladies!

For more information:

Many recipes are included on Chef Joanne Weir’s website.  And be sure to check out Chef Joanne’s schedule of classes at  https://www.joanneweir.com/international-culinary-journeys/ In addition, her TV series Plates and Places can be accessed on Create TV and on Vimeo.

Jnane Tamsna, a boutique hotel near Marrakech, was the site of Culinary Journey in Morocco 2018.  

See photos of Culinary Journey in Morocco 2018 on Flicker.com/photos/placeswesee

 

Posted in Marvelous Morocco, Morocco, Travel | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

True Moroccan style with a sense of calm: Jnane Tamsna

Dramatic palm trees grace the arched entrance to one of the houses at Jnane Tamsna.

Dramatic palm trees grace the arched entrance to one of the houses at Jnane Tamsna.

As the driver pulled onto the property known as Jnane Tamsna, I could immediately feel as if a true Moroccan adventure were unfolding before me.  Jnane Tamsna is like no other resort or boutique hotel in Morocco — or maybe anywhere — thanks to the impeccable design sense of its owner MeryAnne Loum-Martin, a lawyer from Senegal who studied in Paris.  Together with her husband Dr. Gary Martin, a American ethnobotanist and founder of the Global Diversity Foundation, MeryAnne created an oasis near Marrakech that is now the only black female owned hotel in Morocco.  With its 24 rooms spread among five houses on nine acres, Jnane Tamsna has opened its doors, according to Essence magazine, to Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, Giorgio Armani, and Donna Karen, but was my home for a week-long Culinary Journey in Morocco led by San Francisco chef Joanne Weir.

The simple yet dramatic entrance to Jnane Tamsna.

The simple yet dramatic entrance to Jnane Tamsna.

The sense of calm is evident upon arrival.  With a single palm at the entrance, a series of archways led me through the simple, yet elegant main entrance complete with roses floating in a crystal bowl sitting upon a typical Moroccan inlaid chest.   An open book on another invited me to register as a guest.

Floating roses atop an inlaid chest invite guests in for a stay at Jnane Tamsna.

Floating roses atop an inlaid chest invite guests in for a stay at Jnane Tamsna.

The living room became a favorite for me and others with its velvet chairs, indigenous art, and soft lighting.

Gathering room at Jnane Tamsna

Gathering room at Jnane Tamsna

An alcove in the main room invites guests to spend a private moment sipping mint tea offered upon arrival.  And books stacked willy-nilly make anyone feel right at home.

Comfortable alcove flanked by bookshelves invite guests into the main room at Jnane Tamsna.

Comfortable alcove flanked by bookshelves invite guests into the main room at Jnane Tamsna.

Outside, gathering places remain intimate, offering a respite from the jangle of the crowded souks in downtown Marrakech.

Favorite outdoor lounging area with painted tryptych and carved wood panel.

Favorite outdoor lounging area with painted tryptych and carved wood panel.

A stroll through the gardens reveals native plants marked for ready identification. Natural pathways offer closer looks, especially if they’re bordered by twig trellises and blooming bougainvillea, but they’re also where guests wind down on their way to beautiful lodging rooms.

Some of the houses offer spots for gathering. With their Moroccan furnishings — tapestries, weighty furniture, patterned rugs — guests take in the sensory stimuli reminiscent of the beauty of the area.

An outdoor gathering spot takes in the afternoon sun through the vine-covered archways.

An outdoor gathering spot takes in the afternoon sun through the vine-covered archways.

Indoor gathering spot with red patterned accessories: Jnane Tamsna

Indoor gathering spot with red patterned accessories:

Three rooms that I visited were all different.  Painted a deep purplish red, one room was a study in contrasts: cream-colored floor-to-ceiling curtains hung loosely and a patterned rug offered more texture and design.

In another, twin beds under a lush canopy awaited guests and offered a sprig of rosemary on the pillows.

Adding drama to this suite called Calligraphie for its frieze of Arabic writing near the ceiling, was an African garment displayed at the end of an arched hallway.

A third room held a welcoming basket of freshly-picked flowers.

Dining, too, is an experience at Jnane Tamsna.  At one end of the back dining room hangs a colorful, patterned textile and multiple framed portraits. On the ceiling, twigs woven into a grid form a nature-inspired covering.

It’s no wonder that people book Jnane Tamsna for special occasions — wedding receptions, reunions, corporate retreats, cooking schools, and the like.  After all, who wouldn’t want to dine at tables set under the trees overlooking an elegant pool?

Dinner setting under the trees.

Dinner setting under the trees.

Of course, the real treat at Jnane Tamsna is the cadre of people who are ready to serve, to answer questions, to guide you in your travels, and to make you feel at home in this serene oasis right outside Marrakech.  I hope you’ll follow along as I share glimpses of my Culinary Journey in Morocco 2018 with Chef Joanne Weir.  You can’t help but feel the calm and fall in love with the setting that, to me, was the best introduction to Morocco anyone could have.

At the final banquet: Chef Joanne Weir and MeryAnne Loum-Martin

At the final banquet: Chef Joanne Weir and MeryAnne Loum-Martin

For more information:

Jnane Tamsna, Douar Abiad, Palmeraie, Marrakesh 40000, Morocco; +212 5243-28484; jnanetamsna.com

Stunning photos: Follow on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/jnanetamsna/

Please join me in this Travel Series: Marvelous Morocco as I share with you experiences from Culinary Journey in Morocco 2018 with Chef Joanne Weir and my travel experiences afterward with my husband Bert as we journeyed to Ouarzazate, the Sahara, Fes, Chefchaouen, and Tangier.  Our organizer for the trip was Lauren Medley Gunnels with Ortelius Travel Advisors.   — Rusha Sams

Posted in Marvelous Morocco, Morocco | Tagged , , , , , , | 21 Comments

Taking a Travel Break: Headed to Morocco

Well, we’re itching to travel again — this time to Morocco.  And the idea originated with a friend’s suggestion to take a course in Moroccan cooking from San Francisco chef Joanne Weir.  Chef Weir travels to international destinations conducting week-long adventures in sightseeing, shopping, and cooking the cuisine of the area.  Her new TV show, Plates and Places, can be seen on the Create Channel, or you can access videos of her shows through Vimeo. I’ll be with three former educators from Knoxville learning the art of cooking Moroccan dishes in Marrakech for one week.

After cooking school ends, Bert will join me for a travel adventure arranged by Lauren Gunnels, owner of Ortelius Travel.  Lauren has arranged for us to visit the medina, souks, and mosques of Marrakech; tour Ouarzazate and the World Heritage site Ait Ben Haddou; ride to Erg Chebbi, the largest dunes in the Sahara; shop the artisan workshops of Fes; photograph Chefchaouen, a blue lime-washed town; and walk through the medina in Tangier.

The blue-washed walls of Chefchaouen

The blue-washed walls of Chefchaouen

As always, one of our sources of information has been bloggers who have traveled this pathway before.  One site has been especially inspiring:  Image Earth Travel, a photography and travel blog by Nilla Palmer.  Nilla’s photos have inspired us to look at the people and places that contribute to the fascinating culture of Morocco, and we hope to capture some of the same colorful richness of the area that she shares on her blog.

Although we may not be able to respond to your comments for a while due to limited internet access, Oh, the Places We See will return in June ready to share the sights and sounds of a country with much to see.  In the meantime, keep us in your thoughts that our travels will be safe as well as richly rewarding.

We will be posting pictures on Instagram when we have WiFi service:  https://www.instagram.com/rushasams/

Thanks for following!

Rusha Sams

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A Place in the World: Pawleys Beach at Dawn

Pre-dawn view of Pawleys Pier from the Sea View Inn.

Pre-dawn view of Pawleys Pier from the Sea View Inn.

It’s just been in recent years that I’ve chosen to get up before dawn.  Oh, I did it before retirement, of course — to soothe a waking baby, to catch an early flight, or to set up a conference room for a morning meeting.  But now, I can choose to see dawn unfolding. And nowhere do I love it better than on the beach at Pawleys Island, South Carolina.

Quiet time before sun-up

Quiet time before sun-up

Recently, we stayed a few days at the Sea View Inn, one of the few remaining Old South bed and breakfasts that serve three low-country meals each day.  So getting up meant having time for myself in my place in the world without even having to make coffee. It was there, each and every morning, hot and ready for the taking, even before dawn.

Bathed in early morning light, the Sea View Inn on Pawleys Island.

Bathed in early morning light, the Sea View Inn on Pawleys Island.

Before the guests awake:  Sea View Inn

Before the guests awake: Sea View Inn

I left the porch and moved slowly down the beach, passing houses whose windows were lit with morning glow.

Greeting the sun at Pawleys Island.

Greeting the sun at Pawleys Island.

With salmon tones in the background from the almost-up sun, Pawleys Pier jutted out to greet the seas and make ready for sunny days.

Pink light before dawn at Pawleys Pier

Pink light before dawn at Pawleys Pier

Colors changed from smoky pink to peach and orange with a hint of yellow, but just a hint . . .

Orange skies replace pink as the sun's stonger colors come into play.

Orange skies replace pink as the sun’s stonger colors come into play.

until the sun peeked over the horizon, bathing all in early-morning glow.

At Pawleys, I never take dawn for granted.  Never ask for clear skies or cloudy ones with interesting configurations.  Come what may, it’s my place — albeit a temporary one —  just as it is.

To see places loved by other writers, check out WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Place in the World.

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Welcoming in so many ways: The doors of Castine, Maine

We’re not the first nor the only ones to declare Castine a tucked-away gem along the scenic coast of Maine.  Joining us in affirming the charm of this historic Down East hamlet  is Yankee magazine who named Castine one of the 10 Prettiest Coastal Towns in Maine. So it was with great pleasure that we took to walking the streets — not just to immerse ourselves in the ambiance of this tiny but impressive town, but also to look longingly (and enviously) at the architecture and doors of the village.

A Pinterest favorite is this home surrounded by trees of autumn splendor standing in the square of Castine.

A Pinterest favorite is this home surrounded by trees of autumn splendor standing in the square of Castine.

Our typical morning in Castine found us up before dawn, standing at Acadia Dock to greet the sun, and then hiking uphill to the open door (at 7 a.m. no less) of MarKel’s Bakehouse where the smell of hot-from-the-oven blueberry muffins and rich quiches greeted “the regulars” and visitors like us who quickly made friends.

Open for business: MarKel's Bakehouse near the Castine harbor

Open for business: MarKel’s Bakehouse near the Castine harbor

It would be easy to typify this town of predominately white clapboard homes as just another seaside village. But with the British, French, and Dutch all vying for dominance of Castine’s location at the mouth of the Penobscot Bay and settling troops and families in the village, the architecture took on a decidedly European look with embellishments not seen in other coastal Maine towns.  Some white homes in Castine boast painted doors.

But it’s not all white houses in Castine.  Colorful homes as well dot the landscape. Under renovation, this deep red home faces Water Street but opens its back to the beauty of the bay. Here are a few we loved.

Looking a bit like a fixer upper, this deep red beauty gets new doors and updated interior.

Looking a bit like a fixer upper, this deep red beauty gets new doors and updated interior.

Swaths of gray mark the age of this shingled beauty that blends in with the landscape.

At water's edge, a grey-shingled home greets the morning fog.

At water’s edge, a grey-shingled home greets the morning fog.

Dating back to 1796, this home is considered one of the oldest, if not THE oldest, in Castine. Its doorway remains one of its prettiest features, yet one of its darkest.

European styling with stone, plaster, and timber combined in the exterior.

European styling with stone, plaster, and timber combined in the exterior.

An inset door flanked by shutters and benches on the oldest cottage in Castine.

An inset door flanked by shutters and benches on the oldest cottage in Castine.

A few buildings are used for teaching and demonstrating crafts of yesteryear — like this place for blacksmithing with a distinctive red door.

Open only during summer months, this building houses equipment for blacksmithing.

Open only during summer months, this building houses equipment for blacksmithing.

Some cottages are quaint . . .

Gray cottage with black door

Gray cottage with black door

Yellow two-story with framed doorway

Yellow two-story with framed doorway

while others are quite elegant surrounded by walkways, hedges and formal gardens.

Elegant home and former antique shop -- one of the prettiest in Castine

Elegant home and former antique shop — one of the prettiest in Castine

But even among the finest, the largest, the cutest, and so forth, we found a favorite:  a simple, white Cape Cod with red door and stone wall facing the water.  Oh, to have a cup of coffee while sitting in the front window watching the boats sail past.

House with red door and rock fence facing Penobscot Bay

House with red door and rock fence facing Penobscot Bay

You know it’s Castine when even the typical becomes the extraordinary.

Every week, you can find more doors at Norm’s Thursday Doors.

 

 

 

Posted in Autumn Down East, Maine, Travel | Tagged , , , , , | 18 Comments

Weekly Photo Challenge: Lines in Cinque Terre

As we stood with our tour group in Cinque Terre to listen to our guide, we couldn’t help but notice other lines in the landscape.  From clotheslines holding towels on colorful balconies . . .

Towels drying on the line: Cinque Terre

Towels drying on the line: Cinque Terre

to boats lined up and waiting at the base of the famous postcard-pretty hillside where small apartments and houses vie for space on the mountainside.

Boats lined up in Manarola

Boats lined up in Manarola

Half-opened shutters exposed their lines to the morning sun.

Green shutters:  Cinque Terre

Green shutters: Cinque Terre

And wavy lines of umbrellas shaded bathers on a crowded coast

Umbrellas on the beach:  Cinque Terre

Umbrellas on the beach: Cinque Terre

while two churches stood out among other buildings with their  distinguished lined facades.

A lined facade in Cinque Terre

A lined facade in Cinque Terre

Distinctive entrance:  church in Cinque Terre

Distinctive entrance: church in Cinque Terre

Find more lines — straight and curvy —  at Weekly Photo Challenge: Lines.

 

Posted in Destination, Italy, Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , , | 21 Comments

Weekly Photo Challenge: Prolific in Prague

If you want to see lots of anything, just head for Prague where tourists and locals file past prolific bubble blowers waving giant wands of bubbles on busy street corners.

Bubble blowers on the sidewalks of Prague.

Bubble blowers on the sidewalks of Prague.

Keep moving and you’ll see street vendors who make the most of their small display space by hanging their wares above you, dangling in the air.

Suspended marionettes in Prague

Suspended marionettes in Prague

And roofers must have been quite busy as early as the 9th century topping buildings with red clay tiles that you can best see from Prague Castle.

Prague's red clay roofs

Prague’s red clay roofs

Be sure to check out all the interpretations of this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Prolific.  

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Sunrise at Acadia Dock

Early morning sun brightens the waters of Castine harbor where the sailing vessel Bowdoin resides.

Early morning sun brightens the waters of Castine harbor where the sailing vessel Bowdoin resides.

Coastal Maine offers glorious sunrises if you’re willing to wake up early, bundle yourself in layers, and stand on a dock for the morning show.

And you’re never alone.  From birds gliding overhead to lobstermen checking traps before dawn, docks like Acadia in Castine put on a spectacle like no other.

Leaving Acadia Dock before dawn is the Maine Maritime Academy tug awash in early-morning sunlight.

Leaving Acadia Dock before dawn is the Maine Maritime Academy tug awash in early-morning sunlight.

Sunlight filters through lobster traps at Acadia Dock, Castine, Maine

Sunlight filters through lobster traps at Acadia Dock, Castine, Maine

Dawn comes in layers.  First a subtle orange or salmon or pinkish sky.

Aglow in morning light, a lone tethered boat stands ready.

Aglow in morning light, a lone tethered boat stands ready.

Then a peep of light that quickly washes over anything in front of it.

Sunrise: Castine Harbor.

Sunrise: Castine Harbor.

To a full-blown wake-up of morning activities.

Morning light: Castine, Maine.

Morning light: Castine, Maine.

Just another sunrise?  No such thing.

For more sunrises and sunsets, visit the WordPress DailyPost Weekly Photo Challenge:  Rise/Set.

For more posts on the beautiful state of Maine, check our Travel Series:  Autumn Down East.

Posted in Autumn Down East, Maine, Photography, Travel, Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , | 24 Comments

Elms of Castine, Maine

One of Castine's elms stands at the base of Main Street at the entrance to the harbor.

One of Castine’s elms stands at the base of Main Street at the entrance to the harbor.

Considered almost sacred in Castine, Maine, are the stately elms hovering over private residences, shops, and the charming streets of this tucked-away town.  Even the free walking tour map entitled “Under The Elms and By The Sea” focuses on two aspects of Castine that residents (permanent and sometime) and visitors look for year after year.

Leaves turn golden on one of the largest elm trees in Castine.

Leaves turn golden on one of the largest elm trees in Castine.

In the 1930s, Dutch elm disease wiped out many of America’s elms (all told over 77 million of them), but not so much in Castine where a vaccine created in the 70s by Dr. Richard Campana of the University of Maine began systematically identifying, studying, and treating elms.

An ancient elm stands almost as tall as the steeple on Trinitarian Congregational Parish of Castine.

An ancient elm stands almost as tall as the steeple on Trinitarian Congregational Parish of Castine.

With the help of the Castine Garden Club who took on the task of measuring the 100 or so remaining elms, the town fathers developed the Elm Tree Ordinance to monitor and protect these glorious trees. For more oversight, a five-member Tree Committee with a Tree Warden and a Consulting Arborist visit each numbered elm and add data to the statistics on each of the trees that “belong to the city,” according to a resident we talked to. The ordinance states: “The Town shall be responsible for the treatment or removal and disposal of any diseased or damaged elm tree within the public area.”

Trees showing signs of ailment are treated, and, in a worse-case scenario, taken down.  But not without weeping and wailing from the residents.  Mention the Post Office elm, and you’re sure to see sad faces.  Damage, not disease, prompted the removal of the beloved tree after a devastating storm hit Castine in April 2011.

A resident leaves yard raking to explain the care the town of Castine bestows on its treasured elms.

A resident leaves yard raking to explain the care the town of Castine bestows on its treasured elms.

A wealth of elm trees in this yard!

A wealth of elm trees in this yard!

Elms in Castine tower over whatever stands beside them — historic white homes, stately steepled churches, even the cadets of Maine Maritime Academy as they walk down to the harbor for training on board their sailing vessel Bowdoin.

So come to Castine to see the elms.  Be ready to look up.  Be ready to be impressed.  Because elms are honored as an integral part of the history and traditions of Castine.

Treasured by all -- the elegant Castine elms.

Treasured by all — the elegant Castine elms.

For more stories on Castine and other towns in Maine, check out our Travel Series:  Autumn Down East. 

For more information and posts on Castine, check these out.

“Castine elm trees focus of tour,” Castine Patriot, June 23, 2011

Aimee Tucker, “Castine Maine/A Historic Midcoast Maine Tour,” New England Today.

Castine Elm Tree Ordinance, April 2009

Posted in Autumn Down East, Maine, Travel | Tagged , , , , | 10 Comments

WPC: Favorite Place — On board the Bowdoin on Penobscot Bay

Bowdoin setting sail from Acadia Dock in Castine, Maine

Bowdoin setting sail from Acadia Dock in Castine, Maine

Many people have asked us what our favorite place in Maine might be since our trip in the Fall of 2017.  Of course, there are many, but for Tennessee landlubbers like us, sailing the Bowdoin on Penobscot Bay has to be a memory for a lifetime.

Bowdoin, training vessel for Maine Maritime Academy

Bowdoin, training vessel for Maine Maritime Academy

It was the dream of Donald B. McMillan to sail to the Arctic Circle, and that dream in 1921 led to the hiring of a Naval architect, William B. Hand, to design the schooner Bowdoin (named after McMillan’s alma mater Bowdoin College) that would eventually make 30 trips to the Arctic, 25 under the command of McMillan. After serving several owners, Bowdoin finally came under the ownership of the Maine Maritime Academy (located in Castine) for use as a sail training vessel.

Cadets learning to sail aboard Bowdoin

Cadets learning to sail aboard Bowdoin

When not in use for training cadets, Maine Maritime Academy allows community residents and visitors to set sail if crews are available.  And that’s how we were allowed to sail the smooth waters of Penobscot Bay one golden October afternoon.

Sailing at sunset on the Penobscot Bay

Sailing at sunset on the Penobscot Bay

Hoisting the sails, experiencing the quiet of a sail boat on placid waters, and seeing Dice Head Light from the deck of Bowdoin remain some of our fondest memories of Maine.  Most assuredly, we were in a favorite place.

 

See other favorite places in the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Favorite Place.

 

Posted in Autumn Down East, Maine, Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , , | 20 Comments