Memories of Marrakech: Getting around.

Old meets new as a man in traditional Moroccan dress chats with a friend in motorcycle attire.

Old meets new as a man in traditional Moroccan dress chats with a friend in motorcycle attire.

We’re people watchers (especially when we travel), fascinated by how people work, worship, and live in countries other than our own.  And in Marrakech, how people move from one place to another was in stark contrast to how we get around in the U.S.  Rarely did we see cars in lanes (lines on the street were merely a suggestion in some places), and ingenuity ruled the day as far as transportation went.  People got around any way they could — from carts to motorcycles to bikes to skate boards.  Here are a few glimpses of transportation, Marrakech style.

Horse-drawn carriages

Not just for tourists in Jemaa el-Fnaa.  Locals hopped on, too.

Mostly it's tourists who ride in horse-drawn carriages, but locals use them as well, especially in Jemaa el-Fnaa.

Donkeys with carts

Piled high and to the breaking point.

Donkeys pulling carts were the norm for those who needed help with deliveries.

Donkeys alone

Waiting to deliver the goods, a donkey stands tethered in a Marrakech marketplace.

Waiting to deliver the goods, a donkey stands tethered in a Marrakech marketplace.

Carts piled high

Adding a third wheel actually doubles what you can haul!

Adding a third wheel means you can add a cart to a cycle -- double duty, double efficiency.

Carts piled low

Have flatbed, will deliver — open and airy transportation, for sure.

Give me a flatbed, and I'll deliver you some produce -- open and airy transportation, for sure.

And carts filled to overflowing!

No comment needed.  We have no idea how people negotiate mile-high loads!

Walking gets you there. 

Ladies at Koutoubia Mosque get around by foot — possibly the most expedient way in crowded tourist areas.

Ladies at Koutoubia Mosque: Walking won out as most common way of getting around, especially in the areas where tourists want to see the sites.

And so does riding.

A cyclist whizzing by?  Not following the lanes?  Just another day in the streets of the medina.

A motorcyclist speeds through the crowds of the Marrakech medina -- and no one seems fazed at all!

But at the end of the day, a cart can be anything you want it to be.

For more of Marvelous Morocco, check it out here!

About Oh, the Places We See

Met at University of Tennessee, been married for 47 years, and still passionate about travel whether we're volunteering with Habitat Global Village, combining work at Discovery with pleasure, or just seeing the world. Hope you'll join us as we try to see it all while we can!
This entry was posted in Marvelous Morocco, Morocco, Travel and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Memories of Marrakech: Getting around.

  1. I just love this post and all the different modes of transport!!

    • Thanks! I’m sure you’ve seen a lot of transportation in the countries you’ve visited. People whizzing by aren’t unique — it’s just that many people are more creative than I am when it comes to getting by.

  2. tappjeanne says:

    love your pics Rusha – last one especially made me smile

  3. Sue says:

    Yikes – busy, busy! A colourful glimpse , Rusha!

  4. Joanne Weir says:

    Wonderful, thoughtful and creative! Love it Rusha!

    • Thanks so much, Joanne. I’m sure you have memories of more transportation methods than the ones I showed. In fact, I loved our van that took us from Jnane Tamsna to downtown the best!!! Hope all is well with you.

Please leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.