Travel theme: Dried — Pueblo of Acoma

Dried bricks covered in mud form the basis for this church at Pueblo of Acoma.

Dried bricks covered in mud form the basis for this church at Pueblo of Acoma.

Pueblo of Acoma is a mesa community that may have been inhabitated even before the time of Christ. It’s a place where adobe homes are inhabited by strong people, who have managed to live without running water or electricity even during modern times. The word acoma, you come to find outmeans “a place always prepared.”

Most dwellings at Acoma began with mud and a mixture of pebbles, rocks, sticks, and stumps.  And it’s the simplicity of construction that draws you in to appreciate the work and craftmanship that began centuries ago.  As you can imagine, repairs are ongoing, requiring constant rebuilding and refurbishing with earthy elements found on site.

We were drawn to the plainness, the stark exteriors with minimal, if any, ornamentation.

We were drawn to the plainness, the stark exteriors with minimal, if any, ornamentation.

Tourists are welcome but only if they respect the working village and those who call Acoma home.  You can take photos, but not of the residents.

Earthy details invite a closer look at the construction and simplistic beauty of homes at Acoma.

Earthy details invite a closer look at the construction and simplistic beauty of homes at Acoma.

In late afternoon, the sun casts long shadows on this monochrome mesa.  And etched in our memory of our tour of Acoma was the stark yet beautiful architecture of this land and its sturdy, proud people.

Afternoon shadows at pueblo of Acoma

Afternoon shadows at pueblo of Acoma

 

For more of Ailsa’s Travel theme: Dried, go to her website Where’s My Backpack? or click here.  

Travel tip:  Begin your tour of Pueblo of Acoma at Sky City Cultural Center located near Santa Fe, New Mexico.

18 thoughts on “Travel theme: Dried — Pueblo of Acoma

  1. Green Global Trek

    These photos are so lovely. I have to admit I am a BIG FAN of adobe and natural homes. It is my absolute dream to one day build a house out of mud and one hundred percent natural materials.

    Terrific post. Thanks,
    Peta

    1. Oh, the Places We See

      It can be done. We’ve built two such houses in Nepal and Lesotho through Habitat for Humanity. There’s not much to love about living in them when you’re accustomed to indoor plumbing and electricity, but to the families who wanted these, they were mansions!!

  2. Curt Mekemson

    I am always amazed with what the natives of the Southwest could do with mud, bricks and timber, Rusha. It was also true of tribal Liberians when I was in the Peace Corps. –Curt

    1. Oh, the Places We See

      So glad you will be going. I should have written more about this fabulous place. Go to the visitor center at the bottom of the mesa first. Then you’ll ride the bus up to the top. Great experience!

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