Weekly Photo Challenge: Enveloped

If you drive down to the end of St. Pete Beach, Florida, past the historic and very pink Loews Don Cesar Hotel Resort, you’ll find yourself in charming Pass-a-Grille Beach.  And it’s there on tiny Vina Del Mar Island that mailboxes — yes, mailboxes — make you smile.  Well, at least we smiled.  And we’re betting when you see how the U. S. Mail in this tiny stretch of America has been enveloped by sea creatures, you just may smile, too!

Enveloped by a big-eyed sea horse . . .

Seahorse enveloping a mailbox

And this one cuddled by a huggable manatee — while the little one looks longingly for the postman!

Manatee enveloping a mailbox

Or how about being enveloped by a big ol’ wide-mouth bass?

Wide-mouth bass enveloping a mailbox

And last, this slick, silver dolphin proud to be enveloping a mailbox at the end of a Florida driveway.

Porpoise enveloping a mailbox

Totally enveloped now?  Not even close.  Check out more examples of this week’s word in the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Enveloped.  

 

 

 

Posted in Travel, Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Suzie Hall’s Dogwood Open Garden 2015

The woodland home and garden of Suzie Hall.

The woodland home and garden of Suzie Hall.

One word could pretty much sum up the garden of Suzie Hall in South Knoxville: woodsy.  One of the many Dogwood Arts Open Gardens that allowed visitors to roam freely through a private space during the Dogwood Arts Festival designated times, Suzie’s garden is unique for its shade gardening opportunities and natural elements like boulders, tall trees, and a stream running through it.  I might have missed this garden had it not been for Suzie herself visiting the nearby property of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick.  She introduced herself to me and then insisted I come see her place.  So glad she did.

Lovely, woodsy pathway to the second house on the property of Suzie Hall.

Lovely, woodsy pathway to the second house on the property of Suzie Hall.

Suzie’s woodsy garden with its natural, almost uncontrolled pathways holds plants of choice but also “keepers,” those tiny pop-up plants that sometimes get a toe-hold and stay on ’til the owner deems the keeper an invasion.  Suzie said she welcomes all plants — the more the merrier.  So the garden has evolved — a balance of free-spirited plants and intentional ones.

My first sight after parking remains one of the delights of the trip — the sight of a hand-built cabin nestled into that peaceful, woodsy setting. My husband had to move that cabin three times, Suzie said.  And each time, he dismantled it, reconstructed it, and asked if we were done.  But he had it facing the “wrong” way (She smiled.) so he did it over — three times — til he got it just right.  And I just love it.

Focal point of Suzie Hall's garden -- this hand-built cabin, moved to this spot and reconstructed.

Focal point of Suzie Hall’s garden — this hand-built cabin, moved to this spot and reconstructed.

Together, we roamed the pathways that Suzie and her husband had carved out of the property. Everywhere native plants like shade-loving hostas, ground covers, and perennials as well as bulbs and giveaways from neighbors and friends thrived —  a happy, harmonious mix of lush greenery dotted with floral surprises.

The couple had built two houses in keeping with the surroundings and almost a dead match for the original old cabin on the property but with modern conveniences. Expansive decks allow for coffee time.  And contemplation.  And rest.

Large decks allow for quiet time at the home of Suzie Hall.

Large decks allow for quiet time at the home of Suzie Hall.

At the sound of water flowing over a smooth expansion of rock, I paused to bend down and look into the cave beneath.  What a find this property must have been!

A waterfall runs over a mossy boulder.  And underneath is a long, low-ceilinged cave.

A waterfall runs over a mossy boulder. And underneath is a long, low-ceilinged cave.

Suzie’s love for woodland adornments is evident at every turn.  A bottle tree here, birdhouses there.  She pokes plants into found containers like old boots and whatever else comes her way.

It’s no wonder that on the Saturday afternoon of my visit, a photographer and her assistants were busy at work, focusing lights and setting up woodsy vignettes, backdrops for Prom pictures.  Who wouldn’t want to hold the object of one’s affection in such a lovely place?

Couple dressed for the Prom pose for pictures in front of the springtime azaleas in Suzie Hall's garden.

Couple dressed for the Prom pose for pictures in front of the springtime azaleas in Suzie Hall’s garden.

Thanks to the Dogwood Arts Festival Open Gardens committee for finding this natural, woodsy garden.  And thanks to the owner/gardener Suzie Hall for allowing so many garden enthusiasts to enjoy it.

The natural garden of Suzie Hall

The natural garden of Suzie Hall

For a listing of the Open Gardens participants and camera sites for 2015, click here.

And do you have a preference in gardens?  Loosely structured?  Controlled plantings?  We’d love to hear about your love of gardens — just leave us a comment.

Rusha and Bert Sams

 

Posted in Dogwood Arts, Gardens, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , | 7 Comments

The Dogwood Featured Garden of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick

After visiting the stunning West Knoxville garden of Lane Hays, I continued the tour of the 2015 Dogwood Featured Gardens in South Knoxville at the home of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick.  With so many people (locals and out-of-town visitors) having the same idea, a remote parking area was set up in a vacant field out of view of the home and gardens.  But what a benefit!  Some guests rode in a golf cart with Tom Boyd whose Southern welcome became one of the most memorable events of the day.  Others of us walked the short distance only to be rewarded with this spectacular and surprising view not visible from the road or parking area.

The welcoming view of the grounds at the home of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick in South Knoxville.

The welcoming view of the grounds at the home of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick in South Knoxville.

A naturally occurring creek runs through the acreage surrounding the home, but Tom and Sandi have created ponds, added bridges and waterfalls, and manicured the grounds to provide a view that you would never know was here if you hadn’t visited them.  Tom also introduced guests to his dog who seems right at home among the hostas!

Checking out the guests from the comfort of Sandi's garden!

Checking out the guests from the comfort of Sandi’s garden!

According to Tom, Sandi is the mastermind behind the gardens on either side of the house.  Notable for the curved beds and meandering stream, Sandi’s gardens offer a variety of perennials and hostas in various stages of bloom and maturity. Featured in Fine Gardening magazine, the waterfall garden was also used as the cover.  (Source: Dogwood Arts Featured Gardens)

A stream runs through this garden area to the right of the home.

A waterfall at the top of the hillside and the various textures of the hostas add interest to this garden to the right of the main house of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick.

You could almost hear the quiet, the peacefulness of this garden.  In hushed tones, guests wandered around slowly, pointing out various plants and reading the markers Sandi had added for easy identification. Surprises such as little houses and joyful statues could be found tucked among the plantings.

In another area near the waterfall garden, Oriental sculptures blended in with the towering shoots of bamboo and ornamental grasses.

To me, the most appealing aspects of this garden are the many native plants neatly clumped and secured for growing in their designated spaces.  It’s that master’s touch so evident in gardens where the gardener stakes out curved beds, forms intentional pathways, and makes places for everything with everything in its place.  Neat.  Tidy.  Yet natural and free-flowing.  Beauty at every turn.

Beautiful pathway with plantings by Sandi Burdick

Beautiful pathway with plantings by Sandi Burdick

An area of perennials, iris and birdhouses

An area of perennials, iris and birdhouses

Stone pathway leading to another garden area at the home of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick

Stone pathway leading to another garden area at the home of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick

At the end of the tour, Sandi posed with Suzie Hall whose South Knoxville garden had been open for a couple of weeks as one of the designated Open Gardens of the Dogwood Arts Festival.  Rusha, insisted Suzie, you have to come see my garden, too.  It’s just up the street from here.  And today’s the last day it’s open.  Well, what else but YES could I say to an invitation like that?

Gardeners Sandi Burdick and Suzie Hall of South Knoxville

Gardeners Sandi Burdick and Suzie Hall of South Knoxville

So look for the next post as we continue our garden tour through some of Knoxville’s finest! Or just scroll back through these lovely images from the peaceful gardens of Tom Boyd and Sandi Burdick.  We all need a respite now and then.

The happy garden of Sandi Burdick

The happy garden of Sandi Burdick

For more information: 2015 Dogwood Arts Featured Gardens

To see the previous post — Lane Hays’s Garden: Dogwood Arts Featured Gardens 2015click here.

Posted in Dogwood Arts, Gardens, Travel | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

Lane Hays’s Garden: A Dogwood Featured Garden 2015

Greeting us at the entrance to Lane Hays's garden were Dogwood Arts Featured Gardens volunteers.

Greeting visitors at the entrance to Lane Hays’s garden were Dogwood Arts Featured Gardens volunteers.

Although it’s been several years since we last visited the lovely gardens of Lane Hays, we relished the thought of spending quiet time roaming this extensive lakeside property artfully enhanced by Lane’s vision and creativity.  Set on the banks of Fort Loudon Lake in Knoxville, the gardens were begun in 1992 using natural elements of a marble quarry located on the property.  Now, the additions of a cottage garden, rose garden, moon garden, and newly added waterfall features in the back of the property make this a Southern showplace.

From the front of the house, the lake beckons.  Visitors to the property catch glimpses of the water from the planted gardens as well as pathways to the house.  And the walks along the way offer the peacefulness and serenity that typify Lane’s property in both the front and back of her home.

Cottage Garden

Featuring a variety of perennials and annuals in raised beds, the garden has a looseness about it even with careful planning.  Stepping stones, garden statuary, and birdhouses stand among the flowers bordered by picket fencing.  Pebble pathways lead you through the garden with many of the perennials identified by markers.

Rose Garden and Moon Garden

Although only one solitary rose showed its colors for the tour, Lane assured us that by Mother’s Day the fragrance of many varieties of roses will fill the air.  Notable about this garden created in 1996: labels for each variety and an arrangement of plantings that invites leisurely strolling. Also waiting for later spring to show its creamy blossoms was the west-facing moon garden, planted only with white flowers in order to catch the light of the moon as it casts a soft glow on the blooms.

Back Property

Lane led us through the old ornamental iron gate to the back of the extensive property where we were greeted by a stone frog (bought at auction, Lane said) dipping a fishing line into the pond. After walking the pathways we remembered from a previous visit, Lane gave us a tour of the “new” area just completed within the last year.  She’s added a stone bridge, re-positioned massive boulders, and created a formidable waterfall over a previously hidden rock face.  Quite the work of art.

Lane Hays’s backyard garden makes an indelible impression:  deep woods, native and acquired trees, shade-loving plants, and rushing waterfalls.  A respite for anyone touring the gardens that day.

Cathy Greenberg and Lane Hays enjoying the Featured Garden event

Cathy Greenberg and Lane Hays enjoying the Dogwood Arts Featured Garden event

But then all of Lane’s gardens are impressive.  So glad she was open!

For more information:  Dogwood Arts 2015 Featured Open Gardens

 

Posted in Dogwood Arts, Gardens | Tagged , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Artful glass at Matthew Cummings Studio: Dogwood Art DeTour 2015

Glass artists Matthew Cummings and Sam Meketon greet guests at Dogwood Art DeTour 2015

Glass artists Matthew Cummings and Sam Meketon greet guests at Dogwood Art DeTour 2015

What a find:  the Matthew Cummings Studio at 131 Central in the heart of downtown Knoxville — our final stop on our Dogwood Art DeTour for 2015! Never even knew this place existed in the Old City, even though we’d dined at neighboring Crown and Goose and passed it on the way to several Rhythm ‘n Blooms venues along nearby Jackson Avenue.

But the sight of Finer Thoughts (Blue Spade) towering near the front window reassured us we were not only in the right place, but one of note as well.  Glass artists Matthew Cummings (studio owner) and Sam Meketon greeted us.  (Another employee, Thoryn Ziemba, was unable to be there.)

Matthew and Sam immediately began answering our questions.  Like how do you get those fine threads into the glass?  Well, you take a colored strand of glass, pull it out, fold it over, repeat, Matthew told us.

And the effect is stunning.  We moved in for closer looks.

Finer Thoughts (Blue Spade) by Matthew Cummings

Finer Thoughts (Blue Spade) by Matthew Cummings

We love to try new techniques, and art is our passion, Matthew told us. We stood mesmerized by the details in the pieces on display. But sometimes we have to think of ways to pay the bills.  

Finer Thoughts (Red Orb) by Matthew Cummings

Finer Thoughts (Red Orb) by Matthew Cummings

So about four days a week, we make glassware.  Matthew pointed to a row of hand-blown drinking glasses along a ledge.  And we could tell right off this was unique stuff.  Slightly wavy.  A little bit thick.  Good to hold. We call our business Pretentious Beer Glass Company, Matthew added, and we blow each piece on a hollow blowpipe, shape it with pads of wet newspaper or wooden tools, and then grind the bottoms flat.  We hand sign each piece.  (For more info on how they do this, click here.)

Hand-blown glassware from Pretentious Beer Glass Company

Hand-blown glassware from Pretentious Beer Glass Company

Which one is your best seller? I asked.  Well, that would be the Dual Beer Glass, Matthew said as he stepped forward and picked up a glass with a divider piece.  You know like for a black and tan.  (Bert nodded.  He knew.)

See that divider?  Now, that's one unique handblown beer glass, right?

See that divider? Now, that’s one unique handblown beer glass, right?

And, Matthew added, we’re expanding.  When you come back, you’ll see we’re adding a downtown brewery just on the other side of this showroom.  (Love that downtown progress.)

On the way out, we took a closer look at Sam’s and Thoryn’s art: beautifully crafted pieces with infused colors, sensuous shapes.  Would make enviable additions for anyone’s art collection.

We noted how glad we were that the Dogwood Arts DeTour Committee chaired by Matt Salley and Marcia Goldenstein had selected this venue for the tour.  It’s definitely one of a kind.  And right in our own hometown.

For more information:

Matthew Cummings Studio, 131/133 S. Central Street, Knoxville, TN 37902; 865-688-0345;

Pretentious Beer Glass on Etsyhttps://www.etsy.com/shop/PretentiousBeerGlass

Facebook: Matthew Cummings Sculptorhttps://www.facebook.com/MatthewCummingsSculptor

If you missed any of our stops along the Dogwood Art DeTour, here’s a recap of what we saw.

We’d love to know what you thought about the DeTour.  Leave us a comment below.  And thanks for touring with us.

Rusha and Bert Sams

Posted in Dogwood Arts, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Weekly Photo Challenge: Forces of Nature

View from my back door -- ice storm, Winter 2014.

With temps reaching the high 80s in Knoxville today, it’s hard to believe that just a few short months away we were dealing with altogether different forces of nature.  At least two ice storms rolled through the area during our winter months, coating each leaf, branch, and tree with crystal clear ice.  What a difference a few months makes!

Branches coated with ice -- Knoxville, Tennessee

For more pictures of Mother Nature at work, check out the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Forces of Nature here.

Posted in Travel, Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

Saw Works Brewing Company: Dogwood Art DeTour 2015

Johnny Miller supervises the renovation at Saw Works Brewing Company

Johnny Miller supervises the renovation at Saw Works Brewing Company

Who knew Saw Works Brewing Company would be a stop on an art tour?  Well, someone would, and that would be anyone who’s noticed the art of handcrafted brewing exploding in The South.  Saw Works Brewing Company, formerly known as Marble City Brewing,  occupies the old Wallace Saw Works building at 708 East Depot Avenue, next door to Marc Jacobs Denim. And it’s Knoxville’s only micro-brewery.  During the event known as Dogwood Art DeTour on the afternoon of April 12th, Johnny Miller (Tasting Room Manager and Assistant Brewer) seemed pleased to show us around.

The space was quiet on that Sunday afternoon at two-ish.  We’re probably busiest on Fridays, Johnny told us — right about quitting time when folks stop by after work.

Johnny Miller stands ready to give us a tour during Dogwood Arts Festival Art DeTour.

Johnny Miller stands ready to give us a tour during Dogwood Arts Festival Art DeTour.

Chalkboards on the wall hold names of brews — and news of the moment.

Chalkboards at The Mill at Saw Works Brewing Company

Chalkboards at The Mill at Saw Works Brewing Company

And Johnny was quick to point out two best-sellers, now award winners: Rocky Hop and Buzzsaw.  From the website:  Rocky Hop IPAA traditional English platform loaded with tons of American hops, this beautiful autumn hued IPA stays close to our roots. (Makes you wanna try it, right?)

Award-winners on tap at The Mill at Saw Works Brewing Company

Award-winners on tap at The Mill at Saw Works Brewing Company

Kegs stood ready for delivery outside.  And inside (in the back room), we noticed a lot of plastic wound around fermentation tanks.  You’ll have to excuse the mess.  We’re remodeling and quadrupling our production capacity, Johnny told us.  These are all moving out.

A Pour It Forward board seemed like a great idea.  You post the name of a friend, and when the friend comes to Saw Works, he/she gets a free beer.  Good thing Garth Brooks’ name is on the list:  He’s coming to Knoxville’s Thompson-Boling Arena May 28-31 to play for sold-out crowds.  A cold Saw Works Rocky Hop — free — just might be in his future!

Pour It Forward board:  Saw Works Brewing Company

Is your name on the list?

Now don’t just wait ’til it’s Art DeTour time to head over to The Mill, as they call this tasting room on E. Depot Avenue.  The folks at Saw Works offer tours at 5 and 6 PM on Fridays and Saturdays (and sometimes other days).  For 10 bucks, you get a 40-minute tour, a special tour pint glass, and brew, too! Oh, go on.  Do it for art’s sake!

T-shirt, Saw Works Brewing Company

While you’re there, grab a t-shirt from Saw Works!

For more information and touring times:

Saw Works Brewing Company, 708 E. Depot Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37917; 865-247-5952; http://sawworksbrewing.com/the-mill/ and http://sawworksbrewing.com/

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/SawWorksBrewing?fref=ts

Logo:  Saw Works Brewing Company

 

 

Posted in Destination, Dogwood Arts | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Travel theme: Youngsters

As part of the Knoxville Civil War Sesquicentennial celebration this past weekend, the Historic Gaming Club of Knoxville set up miniature battlefields in the East Tennessee History Center.

Gaming Club members set up miniature battlefield.

Knoxville Gaming Club members set up miniature battlefield at East Tennessee History Center.

The goal?  Let youngsters get hands-on experience with troop movements, battle maneuvers, etc., with the roll of the dice.

Ready to roll the dice and determine the next troop movement.

Ready to roll the dice and determine the next troop movement.

Tiny soldiers on tiny fields stood ready with tiny flags, artillery, and such.

Confederate soldiers ready for battle!

Confederate soldiers ready for battle!

Mostly, though, the youngsters we saw discussing the hows and whys of troop movement were the big ‘uns, the ones wearing the blue and the gray!

A big youngster adjusts the playing field!

A big youngster adjusts the playing field!

But a good time was had by all!

For more pics of youngsters, move on over to Ailsa’s blog Where’s My Backpack and check out Travel theme: Youngsters.

For more about Civil War celebrations in Knoxville, go see these sites:

East Tennessee Historical Society: Blue & Gray Reunion and Freedom Jubilee: http://www.easttnhistory.org/bluegray

Knox County Civil War Sesquicentennialhttp://knoxcivilwar.org/Knoxcivilwar/Home.html

Posted in Travel Theme | Tagged , , , , , | 9 Comments

Weekly Photo Challenge: Intricate

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Intricate.”

Stitchery of Taj Mahal

Intricately stitched wall hanging of the Taj Mahal.

The Taj Mahal is known for intricate design, inlays, and details.  But this stitched version seen in a tapestry shop in India caught our tour group’s attention: fine detail executed in tiny stitches in an exquisite wall hanging.  Not surprisingly, there was no price on this piece!

For more intricate details, head to WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Intricate.

Quote | Posted on by | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Mourning Nepal

Durbar Square, Katmandu, before the earthquake on April 25, 2015.

Durbar Square, Kathmandu, before the earthquake on April 25, 2015.

It was four years ago that we fell in love with Nepal.  We traveled to the other side of the world with 12 companions all with the same goal: build two Habitat for Humanity houses near Dhulikel (about two hours from Kathmandu) for two deserving families.  But we never knew our lives would be forever changed by the experience.  Nor could we have predicted that an earthquake on April 25, 2015, would tug at our heartstrings as we mourned Nepal’s losses.

Eyes of Boudhanath Stupa

Eyes of Boudhanath Stupa

The New York Times brought the devastation to our living room with an article on April 26 by Ellen Barry: “Earthquake Devastates Nepal, Killing More Than 1,900.”  But even as we write this post, the toll mounts as reported by Thomas Fuller and Chris Buckley: “Earthquake Aftershocks Jolt Nepal as Death Toll Rises Above 3,400.” 

Something in Barry’s article truly hit home:  Bert and I had been there with our Habitat for Humanity group and toured three of the four now-demolished UNESCO World Heritage Sites — “Bhaktapur Durbar Square, a temple complex built in the shape of a conch shell; Patan Durbar Square, which dates to the third century; . . . and the Boudhanath Stupa, one of the oldest Buddhist monuments in the Himalayas.”

Temple in Bakhatapur

Temple in Bakhtapur — is it standing? (Still searching for pictures on the Internet to find out.)

We remember visiting Bhaktapur on our second day in Nepal when families worked together to sift and lay out grains on huge mats.  Following us around were ladies carrying strands of beads over their arms — until we finally gave in and bought necklaces whether we needed them or not.  People seemed happy that we were there. And we, in turn, felt their pride  — in their community and their buildings which, we learned, bore signature carved wood decorations not seen in many other parts of the world. But now, much is gone.

Highly carved window, Bakhtapur

Ornately carved window, Bakhtapur

In Bakhatapur and in Kathmandu, sites we saw in 2011 are now damaged beyond repair or gone altogether. Like Trailokya Mohan Narayan Temple in Kathmandu where centuries-old craftsmanship of the Nepalese people in this once-frequented house of worship have turned to rubble. A loss that may never be regained. (For more before and after photos, click here.)

Demolished: Trailokya Mohan Narayan Temple, Katmandu.  Photo:  Niranjan Shrestha, Associated Press:

Demolished: Trailokya Mohan Narayan Temple, Kathmandu. Photo: Niranjan Shrestha, Associated Press: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/04/25/world/asia/nepal-landmarks-before-after-earthquake.html

Losing temples, however, is more than just the loss of artistry. Whole communities in Nepal now find themselves without buildings that once were unifying forces.

Like this temple in Kathmandu where we happened upon a group of women lined up to pay homage to the gods they worship.  One by one the women entered the temple, laying down strings of marigolds or setting plates of food in and around the ancient altars. We wonder now if the earthquake’s devastation has created more than a physical loss.  Has it marred, at least temporarily, the spirit of a people known for time-honored traditions? Will the people return to worship?  And where?

Women bringing tributes to a temple in Katmandu

Women bringing tributes to a temple in Kathmandu

Even more devastating than the destruction of cultural icons though is the loss of human lives.   And, for us, this loss in Nepal, a country struggling with many issues, has had a profound effect.  It’s the people, you see, that bring us pause: like those who greeted us cordially, placing marigolds around our necks and smearing red paste on our foreheads.

Women of Nepal greeting us on the site of one of our Habitat builds.

Women of Nepal greeting us on the site of one of our Habitat builds.

It’s the families we met.  And the stone masons who directed our work.  And the children at the job site who trugged up the mountain to get to school each workday, but came back to play with us in the afternoon.

We’re also wondering about the school kids at Bhabishva Ujjwal Primary School in Kavre, about 45 minutes from Kathmandu — children who sang for us and showed us their classrooms and made us feel welcome.  Did the earthquake affect them?  Their families?  Their teachers?

Schoolchildren in Kavre, Nepal watch as we pay a visit to Bhabishva Ujjwal Primary School.

Schoolchildren in Kavre, Nepal watch as we pay a visit to Bhabishva Ujjwal Primary School.

We’re watching, Nepal.  We’re reading whatever we can get our hands on and checking for tweets and Facebook posts.  We’re listening for news of rescue efforts in Nepal and Mount Everest where hikers were caught in a deadly avalanche.  And we’re supporting you with contributions through the Red CrossUNICEFSave the Children, and Habitat for Humanity, among others.

We’re thinking about you.  A lot.

The daughter of one of our Habitat homeowners dressed up for the dedication ceremony.

The daughter of one of our Habitat homeowners dressed up for the dedication ceremony.

For we mourn Nepal and wonder what more we can do.

Namaste, Nepal.

Namaste, Nepal.

For more information:

Barry, E. (April 25, 2015). “Earthquake Devastates Nepal, Killing More Than 1,900.” New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/26/world/asia/nepal-earthquake-katmandu.html

Godlasky, A. (April 27, 2015).  “How to help victims of Nepal quake.” USA Today. Retrieved from: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2015/04/25/nepal-quake-how-to-help/26361193/

Fuller, T. and Buckley, C. (April 26, 2015). “Earthquake Aftershocks Jolt Nepal as Death Toll Rises Above 3,400.” New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/27/world/asia/katmandu-nepal-fear-loss-and-devastation.html?ref=todayspaper

“Nepal’s Landmarks Before and After the Earthquake” (updated April 27, 2015). New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/04/25/world/asia/nepal-landmarks-before-after-earthquake.html

Posted in Nepal, Travel | Tagged , , , , , , | 24 Comments