Weekly Photo Challenge: Rule of Thirds

Calibogue Sound, Hilton Head Island

Gray day at Calibogue Sound, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.

Brings to mind an old saying that seems appropriate on this no-sun day at Hilton Head:

A bad day at the beach is still better than a good day at work!

For more entries in the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge:  Rule of Thirds, click here.

Posted in Travel, Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , | 11 Comments

Coasting: The mystery of the Amelia Island Light

Amelia Island at Fernandina Beach

Amelia Island at Fernandina Beach

The last stop on our Coasting adventure was brief.  Too brief.  And, as it turned out, a bit of a mystery.  We arrived in Amelia Island, Florida, early on a Friday afternoon, anxious to see as much as we could before heading home the next morning.

At a public access, we walked from the parking lot out to the beach.  The view?  Large, naturally rough sand dunes and a wide stretch of beach that looked even wider on a rather foggy afternoon.  (Would love to know what the beach is like on a “crowded” day.)

Then off to find the third lighthouse on our tour, the Amelia Island Lighthouse. (Read about the lighthouses on Tybee Island and St. Augustine in our earlier posts.)  And that’s where the mystery began.

We set the GPS for Lighthouse Road but with no luck.  (We know now from this site to look for North Wolff Street.)  Since we could see the lighthouse in the distance, we kept driving around until Lighthouse Road finally opened up in a subdivision.  Between two houses.  That’s right.  No visitor lot.  No signage.  We wondered what was going on.

Traveling between the two houses on a short stretch took us to a locked gate.  And that’s where the journey ended.  We stared at this sign and went no further.

Sign at Amelia Island Lighthouse

Sign at Amelia Island Lighthouse

With no more information than what we are sharing here, we snapped a picture through the chain-link fence of the lighthouse, even with that pole of a tree obstructing our view. But try as we did, we couldn’t get a better shot since we couldn’t get past the gate.

Our best shot, pole and all, of the Amelia Island Light taken through a chain-link fence

Our best shot, pole and all, of the Amelia Island Light taken through a chain-link fence

One thing for sure:  The Amelia Island Light is lovely.  Standing tall in its white “clothing” only, the lighthouse looked old (and it is) and intriguing (and it is).

So here’s the limited information we found through an Internet search back home.  No guarantees this is accurate.  It’s the mystery we haven’t solved.  But it’s better than nothing.

Just the facts we could find:

  • It’s the oldest lighthouse in Florida located on Amelia Island in Fernandina Beach.
  • Built in 1838-1839, it’s perched high on a bluff above Egan’s Creek.
  • It’s only one of two remaining lighthouses in the state designed by Winslow Lewis, an American lighthouse builder.
  • It’s a double-walled lighthouse — a “cone within a cone” — that stands 67 feet tall and houses a very rare granite staircase.

If you want to see Amelia Island Light . . . 

  • You must make a reservation in advance with Fernandina Beach Recreation Center located on Atlantic Avenue in Fernandina, by calling (904)310-3350.
  • Tours are available only on the first and third Wednesdays, leaving the Rec Center promptly at 10:00.  Tickets are $5.00 for adults, $3.00 for children under 12.
  • Lighthouse tours don’t allow visitors to climb the stairs.
  • Property tours are open to the public on Saturdays from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM.

And that’s all we know about Amelia Island Lighthouse, a light that beckons from the locked gate — and probably looks better up close!

If you’ve been, leave us a comment about what you saw.  This is one mystery we’d love to solve, but we’ll have to get to Amelia Island on a Wednesday!

Resources:

Amelia Island Lighthouse Tour, City of Fernandina Beach

Amelia Island Lighthouse Tours Fernandina Beach, September 16, 2010

“Amelia Island, FL.” LighthouseFriends.com

 

For more posts in our Coasting series, click here.

Posted in Coasting, Travel | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Travel theme: Transformation

We feel hesitant, embarrassed almost, to post these pictures for a Travel Theme challenge. We didn’t travel.  Not even to the mailbox.

Winter Storm Octavia

Early morning transformation of Winter Storm Octavia — mostly ice! on trees

Like much of America, Knoxville was hit with ice storms.  And like many people who encountered Winter Storm Octavia first-hand, we had none of what we now call essentials. No electricity.  No cable.  No television.  No internet.  We were transformed from a couple continually watching The Weather Channel while simultaneously checking email, writing blogs, or surfing the ‘net to a couple trapped in the silence of a winter storm.

We watched from our windows as nature transformed ordinary branches into ice-coated arms reaching ever downward. We could call it “winter wonderland,” but few but the very young were celebrating as closures of offices, schools, and businesses became the norm.

Feeling young again.

Feeling young again.

The silver lining in all of this was our personal transformation the day we kept our granddaughter while her parents braved the elements and returned to work at last.  We — yes we — became makers of snow angels, packers of snowballs, and boasters of first-footprints-in-the field sorta people.

Transforming yourself to a kid again, we found, was not all bad!

For more entries into Ailsa’s Travel theme: Transformation, click here.

Posted in Travel, Travel Theme | Tagged , , , , , | 24 Comments

Coasting: Parting shots — St. Augustine

Strolling St. George Street, St. Augustine, Florida

Strolling St. George Street, St. Augustine, Florida

As we prepared to say good-bye to St. Augustine, a town of many surprises, we remembered the sites that have become must-see’s for tourists:  Castillo de San Marcos, Flagler College, the Oldest Wood Schoolhouse in America, etc.  But we found ourselves leaning more and more toward an appreciation of the ordinary as much the tourist-book notables.

Ordinary is relative, we suppose.  But we mean ordinary in the sense that simple things can tell you about a place as much as its celebrated landmarks.  It’s what you see when you drive down a side street where people live, garden, and decorate for holidays.  The ordinary doorways, windows, and fretwork that have become worn by time.  The out-of-the-way things you share with each other as a way of enjoying “the find” as much as the check-off list.

One of the must-see buildings:  Trinity Episcopal Church, St. Augustine

One of the notables: Trinity Episcopal Church, St. Augustine

So here are some of our parting shots.  Some are ordinary.  But all hold special meaning. Maybe just because of where we were in our journey to “do” St. Augustine.

Sometimes the back of a place can be as interesting as the museum inside.  At the Gonzalez-Alvarez House (the Oldest House in America), the walkway behind the house was adorned with statues representing the seasons.

Walkway behind Gonzalez-Alvarez House, St. Augustine

Walkway behind Gonzalez-Alvarez House, St. Augustine

Further to the right of the walkway, a little house of aging stone held artifacts of a simpler time.

And in the garden, peaceful statues stand among the vines.

Peaceful setting along a garden wall, St. Augustine

Peaceful setting along a garden wall, St. Augustine

Harbor walks offer another side of life as there are usually boats and/or people coming and going.  Here’s a shot taken from the sidewalk that runs along the harbor leading to Castillo de San Marcos.

Harbor scene, St. Augustine

Harbor scene, St. Augustine

And at the Castillo, we marveled at the detail on the aging bronze cannons as much as we stood in awe of the size and strategic position of the fort as a whole.

Cannon detail, Castillo de San Marcos

Cannon detail, Castillo de San Marcos

Some buildings typified the old St. Augustine as no others could.  It wasn’t just one feature — the grillwork, the Spanish moss, the discolored walls.  But rather it was the whole of it that spoke to us.

Spanish moss, windows with balconies -- St. Augustine

Spanish moss, windows with balconies — St. Augustine

St. Augustine came to represent what we think of in terms of a city with history, but also a city of beauty and a city of fun.  It may have just what you’re looking for, but it also may surprise you by showing you what you never knew was there.  At least that’s how it was for us.

For more posts in our Coasting series, click here.

For more information: 

Florida’s Historic Coasthttp://www.floridashistoriccoast.com/

Twitter: @FLHistoricCoast

St. Augustine 450th Commemoration: http://staugustine-450.com/

Facebook: St. Augustine 450th Commemoration: https://www.facebook.com/450th

 

Posted in Coasting | Tagged , , , , | 15 Comments

Weekly Photo Challenge: Symmetry

Some balloons at Albuquerque’s Balloon Fiesta 2014 were notable for their imitation of familiar characters, but others were notable merely for their symmetry and color.  As they floated skyward with little more sound than the click of camera shutters in the background, these peaceful, geometric balloons were simply poetry in motion.

Balloon Fiesta 2014

Shades of purple -- Balloon Fiesta 2014Symmetrical balloonRed, white, & blue -- Balloon Fiesta 2014For more entries in the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Symmetry, click here.

Posted in Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , | 22 Comments

Coasting: Climbing’s not necessary to enjoy St. Augustine Light!

St. Augustine Lighthouse

St. Augustine Lighthouse

With our third entry in the Coasting series based upon our stay in St. Augustine, we have this maybe-because-we’re-old-folks revelation:  You don’t have to climb to the top to enjoy the St. Augustine Lighthouse!  Really? you might say in disbelief.  You couldn’t even make it 219 steps for a glimpse of the nation’s oldest port and the beach and the city?

Well, sometimes you just can’t do it all when you travel.  Or you’re not able.  Or just not inclined. But you can make the most of what you see.

So what’d you do if you didn’t climb up? you might ask.  And we’d answer: Try this! 

1.  Stand back and look up.

At 126 years old, the St. Augustine Light is just one of six Florida lights open to the

Window detail, St. Augustine Lighthouse

Window detail, St. Augustine Lighthouse

public.  We loved the barber-shop swirls in black and white — its daymark, we learned.  A daymark allows mariners to establish their location during daylight hours just by seeing the unique marking or paint on any given lighthouse. If you were to see these swirls, you’d know you were at St. Augustine.

On the other hand, a nightmark  is the timing of a lighthouse’s flashing signal that identifies this and only this one particular beacon for seagoing vessels.  Before the automation in place today, the St. Augustine Lighthouse was known for this nightmark:  one bright flash every three minutes, a pattern that existed for 62 years.

2.  Go inside.  Read.  Take pictures. 

Pretty impressive were the displays of artifacts housed in the lighthouse museum, the little house with the red roof.  From the history of shipwrecks to discussions of archaeological finds, the museum collections tell the story well.  (Read the lighthouse story here.)

Artifacts -- St. Augustine Lighthouse and Museum

Artifacts — St. Augustine Lighthouse and Museum

You can also peer into the stairwell for patterns and photo-ops or just chat with the ones who made it to the top and back.  You can even ask a ranger about the paranormal tour — Dark of the Moon   that will take you to the top for a moonlight view of St. Augustine.

View of the stairwell -- St. Augustine Lighthouse

View of the stairwell — St. Augustine Lighthouse

3.  Visit the Harns where they used to live.

In the setting of an actual lightkeeper’s home in the 1880s, learn about the family of William Harn, the first long-term St. Augustine Lighthouse keeper  (1875-1889).  Sit in the Victorian parlor, read about the six daughters in the Harn family, or try your hand at some of the interactive games.  At Home with the Harns helps you imagine what it would be like to live onsite and maintain a lighthouse day in and day out.

4. Watch artisans at work.

We’re not sure how many artisans ply their trade in an area to the right of the lighthouse or even which days of the week.  But we could see one artisan scrutinizing an old piece for cleaning and repair.

Artisan scrapes and cleans an old piece at the site of the St. Augustine Lighthouse.

Artisan scrapes and cleans an old piece at the site of the St. Augustine Lighthouse.

Fascinating indeed was one finely crafted boat sitting under cover where we could examine the dovetailed joints and braces holding pieces together.  Digging through the St. Augustine Lighthouse website revealed this information:  Three mornings per week (Tuesdays through Thursdays), volunteer craftsmen build traditional wooden boats.

And according to the site: Using an old steamer box to soften the wood, each board is carefully molded into the keel, ribs and planking of a functioning vessel. Once a year, a completed boat is auctioned off to raise money for the maritime preservation and educational programs at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Museum.

5.  And then just envy those who climb.

OK.  So we really wanted to climb.  Just couldn’t make it on the day of our trip.  We looked up.  Then waved.  Then said, We oughta come back.  That view is bound to be worth the stairs!!!

People at the rim looking down from the St. Augustine Lighthouse

People at the rim looking down from the St. Augustine Lighthouse

Whether you ascend the light or remain grounded, the St. Augustine Lighthouse won’t disappoint.  So here’s what we say: Travel at your own place.  But make the most of any adventure, no matter when you go.

Have you been to the top of the St. Augustine Lighthouse?  If so, tell us what we missed.  We’d love to know what you saw!

Thanks for Coasting with us,

Bert and Rusha

For more information:

St. Augustine Lighthouse and Museum, 100 Red Cox Rd., St. Augustine, FL 32080; 904-829-0745; http://www.staugustinelighthouse.org/

Hours, tours, and events: http://www.staugustinelighthouse.org/visit/main

St. Augustine Lighthouse and Museum on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/staugustinelighthouse

 

 

Posted in Coasting, Travel | Tagged , , , , | 21 Comments

Travel theme: Details

Studying the detail on a Calvin and Hobbes cake in The Great Cake Bake 2014

Studying the detail on a Calvin and Hobbes cake in The Great Cake Bake 2014

The Great Cake Bake in Knoxville draws entries from some of the area’s finest bakers, cake makers, and even some novices interested in dabbling in the art of embellishment. With proceeds from admission tickets going to Dolly Parton’s Imagination of Knoxville initiative (to send books to children in Tennessee each month free of charge), cakes and cupcakes must be designed around a book title or character.  And the details warrant second, third . . . even fourth glances!

focused on Hobbes in this cake topper from The Great Cake Bake 2014.

Calvin seems quite focused on Hobbes in this cake topper from The Great Cake Bake 2014.

Great detail in this cake depicting the book Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

Great detail in this cake depicting the book Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

Another category — Wedding Cakes — offers a glimpse into the sophisticated, artistic world of detailed cakes for a bride and groom’s special day.  Amazing, right?

Great detail in this cake depicting the book Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

Great detail in this cake depicting the book Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

This year’s Great Cake Bake is February 28, 2015, from 12:00 to 5:00 PM at Neyland Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee.  Well worth the trip — especially if you are lucky enough to bring home one of these detailed designs!

Click here for more entries in this week’s Travel theme: Details from Ailsa’s blog, Where’s My Backpack?

Posted in Travel Theme | Tagged , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Weekly Photo Challenge: Scale

Pike Place Fish Market

Just look at the fish — scales and all — at Pike Place Fish Market, Seattle!

Want scale?  Look no further than Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle! Scaly fish.  Scales to weigh fish.  Or scales in your hand if you let the guys toss one “atcha”!

Friendly fishmonger -- Pike Place Fish Market, Seattle

Fishy hugs? No problem. Bring ‘em on!

And on a scale from 1 to 10, I’d rate this hug from this always-smilin’ fishmonger a 10 plus!

For more entries in the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Scale, click here.  

Posted in Weekly Photo Challenge | Tagged , , , , , | 42 Comments

Coasting: Scenes from Castillo de San Marcos

Marker --  Castillo de San MarcosIf you’re the oldest masonry fort in the continental United States, you deserve to be seen, climbed on, photographed, and written about.  Right?  Well, we think so. Of the three forts we toured (Fort Frederica in St. Simons, Georgia; Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, and Fort Clinch in Fernandina Beach, Florida) during our trek along the coasts of Georgia and Florida, this one – Castillo de San Marcos — dwarfs the others with a mostly intact hollow square and diamond-shaped bastions at each corner. It stands today mostly as it did over 300 years ago as a fortress capable of protecting the people of the area. Facing the waters from the left bank of Matanzas Bay, the Castillo held a superior vantage point.  And the sturdy, thick walls of a thick sedimentary rock called coquina (Spanish for “small shells”), became a primary factor in protecting St. Augustine from pirate raids and Spain’s major rival — Great Britain.

The shape of Castillo de San Marcos as seen by air (photo by Wikimedia)

The shape of Castillo de San Marcos as seen by air (photo by Wikimedia)

Built by the Spanish after watching Sir Francis Drake and other pirates attack St. Augustine over the course of many years , the Castillo was begun in 1672 and completed by 1695, replacing nine previous wooden fortifications.   Its greatest test came during the War of the Spanish Succession when the English occupied St. Augustine, burning the town before they left. But the Castillo remained unscathed even after 50 days of attack, making it a symbol of the strength and endurance of what was to become new St. Augustine.

Plaza de Armas, Castillo de San Marcos

Plaza de Armas, Castillo de San Marcos

Although the fort has been called by many names, the original name of Castillo de San Marcos was restored in 1942.  Now a part of the National Park Service, Castillo de San Marcos National Monument is open to the public every day except December 25th.

Above and below -- Castillo de San Marcos

Above and below — Castillo de San Marcos

We took our time looking inside rooms that once held soldiers who normally stayed in their own homes in town but came in for rotating guard duty.  And as usual, we stopped to read information posted in the guard rooms, storage rooms, and powder magazine.

Outside on the upper level, we walked the bastions taking a closer look at beautifully wrought cannons, a thick-walled bell tower, and peaceful views of Matanzas Bay.  The aging structure of the Castillo offers scenery not just of itself but distant glimpses of towers and rooftops of St. Augustine.

The Castillo offers something for every age group. And ever-ready rangers give talks as small groups of visitors crowd around to learn more.

Ranger waits for crowd to gather prior to her talk on Castillo de San Marcos

Ranger waits for crowd to gather prior to her talk on Castillo de San Marcos

Of course, we think touring the Castillo de San Marcos is one of the six must-do’s of the area.  But don’t take our word for it.  Look up some information.  Take a gander at your schedule.  And see if you can find time for this memorable glimpse into the history of St. Augustine.  You’ll be glad you did.

Colorful re-enactors at Castillo de San Marcos

Colorful re-enactors at Castillo de San Marcos

For more information:

Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, 1 S. Castillo Dr., St. Augustine, FL; 904-829-6505; www.nps.gov/casa

“Castillo de San Marcos.” National Park Service website: http://www.nps.gov/casa/

“Castillo de San Marcos.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia.  Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castillo_de_San_Marcos

Photo of Castillo de San Marcos.  Wikimediahttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/Castillo_de_San_Marcos.jpg

St. Augustine’s 450th Celebration: Facebook.com/450th and Twitter.com/StAugustine450

For more posts in our Coasting series, click the picture of the pelican in the right-hand column of this blog.  Or go to the Page at the top labeled Travel Series — Coasting.

Thanks for traveling the coasts of Georgia and Florida with us!

Bert and Rusha

 

Posted in Coasting, Travel | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments

Coasting: Six must-do’s in St. Augustine, Florida

Horse-drawn carriage, St. Augustine, FL

Horse-drawn carriage, St. Augustine, FL

This is the year! America’s oldest city, St. Augustine, Florida, celebrates its 450th anniversary! So this is your year to plan a trip and make a list — a “must-do list” for beautiful St. Augustine.

Not sure what we expected, having waited until our retirement years to see St. Augustine for the first time.  But now we’re wondering what took us so long.  St. Augustine melds the Old World charm of New Orleans with the Bohemian atmosphere and laid-back fun of Key West into one.  For history buffs or party-hardies, St. Augustine comes in just right. Here are our six must-do’s for when (not if!!) you come down South to the city with the slogan “Beautiful beaches and the rest is history”!

Gonzalez-Alvarez House, "the Oldest House" in St. Augustine

Gonzalez-Alvarez House, known at “The Oldest House” in St. Augustine, dates back to the early 1600s. 271 Charlotte St.

1.  Soak up the beauty

It wasn’t five minutes after we stepped out the door of our B & B on Cedar Street that we grabbed our cameras and pointed upwards at the impressive architecture of the Flagler Buildings.  An original partner with John D. Rockefeller, Henry M. Flagler arrived in St. Augustine in 1883, had two new hotels built (the Ponce de Leon and the Alcazar), and purchased the Casa Monica (a Moorish Revival building) renaming it the Hotel Cordova.

Courtyard of the Lightner Museum, St. Augustine

Courtyard of the Lightner Museum, St. Augustine

Now, the Hotel Ponce de Leon is the home of Flagler College, and the buildings represent some of the finest examples of Spanish Renaissance architecture in America.  The Alcazar has become the Lightner Museum known for its extensive collection of Louis Tiffany stained-glass art. And, if you wish, you can spend a night or a week at the Hotel Cordova!

2.  Walk through time

After you stroll the campus of Flagler College and get a feel for the beauty of the Lightner Museum, you’re primed and ready to explore history on foot.  Be sure to head down Aviles Street, the oldest street in North America dating back to the 1500s.  Charm is the operable word here — a long bricked street frequented by horse-drawn carriages passing diners eating outside.

Dining out on Aviles Street

Dining out on Aviles Street

Here’s where you’ll shop if you love quality goods, art, and antiques.  Drop in at Georgia Nick Gallery and ask to see Georgia’s hand-made note cards sporting her own photos from around the city.  Or find a fashionable long skirt and creatively designed bracelet at Candida’s Closet.  Don’t miss Aviles Gallery where we fell in love with the watercolors of artist Pam Pahl.

Put on your walking shoes for the longer (and possibly more crowded) St. George Street, where shops have become comfortable in some of the most treasured homes of the city.  If you’re a history snob, you’ll have to overlook ice cream parlors, coffee shops, and t-shirts, but don’t let that stop you.  Spanish Colonial-style masonry homes abound, some with coquina structure (rock formed with tiny embedded shells) and original foundations.  Stand by the Oldest Wooden Schoolhouse (everyone does!) and remember that it’s the oldest surviving wood frame building (cedar and cypress) in St. Augustine.  Go inside to see rare school books, slates, maps, and such. (Open daily, admission charge.)

3.  Fort-ify your outlook

Castillo de San Marcos is the oldest masonry fort and the only extant 17th century fort in the continental U. S. Built in 1672-1695 to protect the town and treasure fleets on their way to Spain, Castillo de San Marcos  is the granddaddy of all the forts in our Coasting series.  The fort offers you a view of city buildings and Matanzas Bay from several vantage points as well as a chance to pose for a “selfie” beside the cannons!

Inside Castillo de San Marcos

Inside Castillo de San Marcos

4.  See the light

One of only six lighthouses in Florida open to the public, the 126-year-old St. Augustine Lighthouse and Museum offers an authentic look inside and out.  Climb 126 steps to the top.  Or stay below, tour the museum, and watch craftsmen at work on the ground.

5. Sleep Inn 

Whether you prefer luxury accommodations, a night in a historic property, or the comfort of a B&B, you’ll find interesting places to spend time in St.

Augustine!  Use your favorite internet search engine or Florida’s Historic Coast for reservations, but don’t wait too long.  Special events like Rhythm & Ribs Festival (April 10-12, 2015), Celebrate 450! (September 4-15, 2015) and the 7th Annual Pirate Gathering (dates TBD) fill up available accommodations fast.

Blue Christmas theme at At Journeys End

A Blue Christmas theme with Elvis on the balcony: At Journeys End, St. Augustine

Our B&B, At Journey’s End, and the other three on Cedar Street were still decorated for the Annual Bed and Breakfast Holiday Tour.  Lucky us.  Elvis greeted us from the balcony, smiled at us from the front yard, and graced us with renditions of “Blue Suede Shoes” from a hidden boom box.  Or some such apparatus!  And we loved it!

6.  Eat out! Drink Up!

Our view from the bar at Cellar 6, Aviles Street, St. Augustine, Florida

Our view from the bar at Cellar 6, Aviles Street, St. Augustine, Florida

Make it a point to search for what makes St. Augustine truly unique — an eclectic mix of restaurants offering everything from Cuban sandwiches at the casual La Herencia Cafe on Aviles Street to the upscale Cellar 6 where we toasted in the New Year at the bar. (Best place to view the action and get to the know the bartender!)

But our one “blown-away” place had to be Ice Plant.  Focused on the art of mixing cocktails such as Florida Mule with vodka from their own St. Augustine Distillery located next door, Ice Plant also serves farm-to-table food (think grass-fed beef and local veggies).  Even if you don’t eat a thing, you should order a drink (even the type of ice is selected) at one of two bars in this renovated 1927 ice plant, smile at the waiters dressed in their 20s working-class attire, and understand just what made Garden & Gun take note.

Shaken not stirred at Ice Plant, St. Augustine

Shaken not stirred at Ice Plant, St. Augustine

Here’s hoping you’ll find lots to put on your must-do list in St. Augustine. We certainly more to explore if we ever return.  And if you’ve been, why not leave us a comment:  What was your favorite thing to do in St. Augustine?

Who knows?  Come September, we may all gather to Celebrate 450!

Harbor scene, St. Augustine

Harbor scene, St. Augustine

For more information:

Twitter.com/FlHistoricCoast

Facebook.com/OfficialStAugustine

Instagram.com/FloridasHistoricCoast

Celebrate 450http://staugustine-450.com

Twitter.com/StAugustine450

Facebook.com/450th

For more posts in our Coasting series, click on the pelican on the right-hand side of this blog. And thanks for traveling the coast with us! Bert and Rusha

 

Posted in Coasting | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments